FDA officially authorizes booster shots for people over 65 and those at high risk


More good news on the vaccine front: the Food and Drug Administration just authorized the booster shot for people over 65 and at-risk. There have been many articles and reports released about the various vaccine’s efficacy rates at so many months out, which has led to speculation over the need for booster shots. It is now believed, with the Delta variant becoming dominant and other variants being watched, that booster shots will be needed for almost everyone. Originally, we were told boosters should be administered eight months after we became vaccinated. In August, Pres. Biden said they would most likely be able to offer booster sooner. However, once those boosters became available, the FDA issued a statement recommending that the general population should not receive a booster at this time. On Wednesday, however, the booster was authorized for the elderly and high-risk population who received their 2nd dose at least six months ago.

The Food and Drug Administration has authorized a booster shot for Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine among some populations.

The single booster shot must be administered at least six months after completion of the first two doses. Those eligible to receive the booster include individuals 65 years of age and older, anyone older than 18 who is at high risk of severe COVID-19, and those 18 and over who are at risk of serious complications from COVID-19 due to high exposure at their job.

Some of the populations who fall under these categories are “health care workers, teachers and day care staff, grocery workers and those in homeless shelters or prisons,” acting FDA Commissioner Janet Woodcock, M.D., said in a statement Wednesday.

The latest authorization amends the FDA’s previous emergency use authorization for the Pfizer vaccine. In August, the initial two-dose series of Pfizer’s shot was granted full approval by the FDA for people 16 years and older.

Some of the populations who fall under these categories are “health care workers, teachers and day care staff, grocery workers and those in homeless shelters or prisons,” acting FDA Commissioner Janet Woodcock, M.D., said in a statement Wednesday.

The latest authorization amends the FDA’s previous emergency use authorization for the Pfizer vaccine. In August, the initial two-dose series of Pfizer’s shot was granted full approval by the FDA for people 16 years and older.

“This pandemic is dynamic and evolving, with new data about vaccine safety and effectiveness becoming available every day,” Woodstock said. “As we learn more about the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines, including the use of a booster dose, we will continue to evaluate the rapidly changing science and keep the public informed.”

[From People]

As predicted, the booster roll-out will likely mirror the initial roll out. It will go to the highest risk first and other age groups after those studies are completed. I included the last paragraph in the excerpt because again, the onslaught of information about vaccines is important. This virus, while it feels interminable, is new in terms of being studied as a disease and vaccine. And the constant monitoring and adjusting is vital for our safety. The back and forth, despite how Fox News and anti-vaxxers want to spin it, proves our very best minds are on top of it.

The bad news is I don’t have a definitive answer for you about mixing boosters. The booster authorized was the Pfizer booster. I can’t find if those who received the the Moderna vaccine can take the Pfizer booster. Moderna also has a booster submitted for authorization, that’s still pending. Johnson & Johnson recipients, however, may not have the Pfizer or Moderna boosters at this time. However, as CB reported, the J&J efficacy rate is still very high at this point. Obviously your medical professionals will know the correct information for you so check with them if you qualify for the booster. We can still hope for a semi-safe holiday season, y’all.

photos credit: Avalon.red

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