Prince Charles opens a green CO2 power plant in a visit to Dorset

Green peace! Cheerful Prince Charles looks relaxed as he opens sustainable CO2 power plant during a visit to his Poundbury designer village as Prince Harry wages war with the BBC

  • Prince of Wales, 72, visited an anaerobic digester plant near Poundbury in Dorset
  • Charles opened BioCarbonics, a new joint venture that will produce green CO2
  • It comes after he described the birth of granddaughter Lilibet as ‘happy news’

The Prince of Wales was all smiles today on a visit to a biogas plant near Poundbury, Dorset, despite a row between his son Prince Harry and the BBC over the name of the newest member of the royal family. 

Charles, 72, looked in good spirits as he unveiled a plaque at Rainbarrow Farm, an anaerobic digester plant, where he officially opened BioCarbonics, a new joint venture that will produce green CO2 in a sustainable manner for use by the food and drink and horticultural industry.

It marks Charles’ first visit to the ‘designer village’, which is built on land owned by the Duchy of Cornwall, since the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic. 

The visit comes hours after Prince Harry threatened the BBC with legal action after it reported that he and Meghan Markle did not ask the Queen for permission to name their daughter Lilibet.

Senior Buckingham Palace sources told BBC royal correspondent Jonny Dymond this morning that the Queen was ‘never asked’ her opinion on the couple’s decision to name their new baby after her childhood nickname.

However, Harry hit back within 90 minutes of the BBC’s report being published through a statement from his and Meghan’s close friend Omid Scobie that insisted the Queen was the first person the Duke called after the birth of his daughter.

Prince of Wales, 72, visited an anaerobic digester plant, Rainbarrow Farm, near Poundbury in Dorset today, after describing the birth of grandaughter Lilibet as ‘happy news’

Prince Charles yesterday described the birth of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s daughter Lilibet as ‘happy news’ after he became a grandfather for the fifth time. 

This afternoon, Charles met with site staff and board members from J V Energen, who own the power plant in a joint venture partnership between the Duchy of Cornwall and local farmers.

Poundbury, in Dorset, which mixes private and affordable housing side-by-side, is owned by Charles’ Duchy of Cornwall estate, which covers more than 130,000 acres across 23 counties. 

The heir to the throne also visited the Royal National Lifeboat Institution’s (RNLI) College to witness its lifesaving training as the charity prepares for thousands of people to flock to the beaches during staycations this summer.

He wore sunglasses as he unveiled a plaque to officially open BioCarbonics, a new joint venture that will produce green CO2 in a sustainable manner

Charles met with site staff and board members from J V Energen, who own the power plant in a joint venture partnership between the Duchy of Cornwall and local farmers

Charles watched a live demonstration by lifeboat trainers and volunteers in the Sea Survival Centre in Poole, Dorset.

He saw an exercise involving the righting of a capsized inshore lifeboat in a wave tank, with simulated thunder, lightning and darkness.

The prince heard of the challenges the RNLI has faced during the pandemic, as it kept operational throughout, saving 349 lives last year.

Stuart Popham, RNLI chairman, said: ‘Our committed volunteers have maintained a 24/7 rescue service throughout the pandemic and today was an opportunity for the prince to personally thank some of them for their dedicated service.

‘We are expecting another busy summer as more and more people flock to the UK and Irish coastlines and His Royal Highness’s visit will help raise the profile of our services and how the public can keep themselves safe.’

 It marks Charles’ first visit to the ‘designer village’, which is built on land owned by the Duchy of Cornwall, since the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic

Yesterday, The Prince of Wales commented the birth of Lilibet ‘Lili’ Diana Mountbatten-Windsor after she was born to Prince Harry and Meghan Markle in California on Friday 4 June

Prince Charles’ comments come after royal biographer Robert Jobson claimed the royal is ‘unlikely to meet his new granddaughter for some time’.

Training, which is now back to a full programme, was paused during the height of lockdown to protect crew and keep the lifeboat service in operation throughout the Covid-19 crisis.

The charity said that 2020 was busier than ever for the RNLI as people headed to the beaches at home rather going abroad, so training was vital to meet the growing demand.

Only one in 10 of the RNLI’s volunteer crew members come from a professional maritime background, so training is essential.

In 2004, the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh officially opened the College.

Charles paid his respects at the RNLI Memorial – a sculpture which honours the courage of all lifeboat crew and search and rescue service people lost at sea while endeavouring to save the lives of others. 

Later today, the prince also visited the Royal National Lifeboat Institution’s (RNLI) College to witness its lifesaving training (pictured at the Sea Survival Centre in Poole, Dorset)

Charles watched a live demonstration by lifeboat trainers and volunteers undertaking an exercise involving the righting of a capsized inshore lifeboat in a wave tank

The prince heard of the challenges the RNLI has faced during the pandemic, as it kept operational throughout, saving 349 lives last year

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