Greeks hoping to enlist the King to help return Elgin Marbles

Greeks are hoping to enlist the King in battle to return Elgin Marbles to Athens

  • Greek PM Kyriakos Mitsotakis believes Britain is closer to handing them back
  • 2,500-year old Elgin marbles were taken from the Parthenon between 1801-1812
  • The British Museum Act 1963 prevents ownership of artefacts being transferred 
  • Mr Mitsotakis, 54, said he has a ‘good personal relationship’ with King Charles 

The Greek prime minister is hopeful King Charles will aid his latest bid to return the Elgin Marbles to Athens.

Kyriakos Mitsotakis believes Britain is edging closer to handing back the sculptures and will raise the issue with Liz Truss on a visit to London later this year.

The 2,500-year-old marbles were taken from the Parthenon between 1801 and 1812 by Lord Elgin, ambassador to the Ottoman Empire. 

The Greeks say they were stolen, but the British Museum Act 1963 prevents ownership of artefacts being transferred from the museum.

The Greek prime minister is hopeful King Charles will aid his latest bid to return the Elgin Marbles to Athens (pictured on display in the British Museum in 2020)

Mr Mitsotakis, 54, told The Sunday Times he had a ‘good personal relationship’ with King Charles and believes he is supportive. 

The King, he said, has ‘a Greek heritage which he values and cherishes’, adding: ‘I think the mood is changing in the UK.’

It has emerged that Greek businessman John Lefas, 71, is investing millions to fly British MPs to Athens to lobby them to overturn UK law and allow the marbles’ return.

Lord Vaizey, a former Tory culture minister, has already taken the trip as part of the Parthenon Project, The Sunday Telegraph reported.

The 2,500-year-old marbles were taken from the Parthenon between 1801 and 1812 by Lord Elgin, ambassador to the Ottoman Empire (pictured: a section of the marbles)

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