Lego unveils largest ever set – a 9,036-piece Roman Colosseum

Perfect for lockdown! Lego unveils its largest ever set – a 9,036-piece Roman Colosseum that takes two-weeks to finish

  • The toy structure is 10.5 feet high and 20.5 feet wide making it largest produced 
  • Title for largest set produced was held by Millennium Falcon set from Star Wars 
  • It comes complete with landscaping and features ‘many true-to-life details’ 

Lego has unveiled the perfect lockdown activity – their largest ever 9,036-piece set of the Roman Colosseum.

The model, which will take two-weeks to finish, is an impressive 10.5 feet high, 20.5 feet wide and 23.5 feet deep, making it the largest set ever produced. 

Previously, the title for the largest set produced by the company was the Millennium Falcon set from Star Wars reports Fox News.   

Lego has unveiled the perfect lockdown activity – their largest ever 9,036-piece set of the Roman Colosseum

The toy structure comes complete with landscaping and features ‘many true-to-life details’ according to Lego.    

The brick model of the Colosseum has columns in the ‘Doric, Ionic and Corinthian’ styles.   

Although the Lego version of the iconic amphitheater is not exactly true to historic form in all respects, designer Rok Zgalin Kobe admits.

The toy structure comes complete with landscaping and features ‘many true-to-life details’ according to Lego 

He said: ‘One of the biggest challenges and one of the most important things was to convey the Colosseum’s monumentality in the LEGO form.’ 

He added that the cross-section is ‘far steeper than on the original structure’ but hopes people will be ‘inspired to learn more about the original’ through the model. 

The company said that they included three shades of brick to replicate the different columns to stay true to the details of the nearly 2,000-year-old landmark.  

The Lego Colosseum will launch on Black Friday on November 27. 

The model, which will take two-weeks to finish, is an impressive 10.5 feet high, 20.5 feet wide and 23.5 feet deep, making it the largest set ever produced

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