North Koreans banned from LAUGHING or drinking to mark Kim Jong-Il’s death

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The former leader of North Korea ruled from 1994 until his death on December 17, 2011. In tribute to the dead leader, his son Kim Jong-un’s Government has ordered the public to not show any signs of happiness for 11 days.

During the national period of mourning, North Korean’s are not allowed to laugh or drink alcohol.

One citizen from the northeastern border city of Sinuiju said: “During the mourning period, we must not drink alcohol, laugh or engage in leisure activities.”

They added North Koreans are also not allowed to go grocery shopping on December 17.

Speaking to Radio Free Asia, the source added: “In the past many people who were caught drinking or being intoxicated during the mourning period were arrested and treated as ideological criminals.

“They were taken away and never seen again.

“Even if your family member dies during the mourning period, you are not allowed to cry out loud and the body must be taken out after it’s over.

“People cannot even celebrate their own birthdays if they fall within the mourning period.”

Speaking to Radio Free Asia, the source added: “In the past many people who were caught drinking or being intoxicated during the mourning period were arrested and treated as ideological criminals.
“They were taken away and never seen again.
“Even if your family member dies during the mourning period, you are not allowed to cry out loud and the body must be taken out after it’s over.
“People cannot even celebrate their own birthdays if they fall within the mourning period.”

Another source, from southwestern province South Hwanghae, said police officers are told to watch for people who fail to look appropriately upset during the mourning period.

They said: “From the first day of December, they will have a special duty to crack down on those who harm the mood of collective mourning.

“It’s a month-long special duty for the police. I heard that law enforcement officials cannot sleep at all.”

They also said citizens groups and state-owned companies have been ordered to take care of those in poverty during the period of mourning, as the country grapples with a food crisis.

It comes as human rights group The Transitional Justice Working Group accused North Korea of trying to stop leaks to the outside world about public executions.

They analysed satellite imagery and collected testimonies of 23 public executions during Kim Jong-un’s reign from 2011.

North Korean escapees said executions were carried out at closely monitored sites with authorities keeping a close eye to ensure no information gets out, the TJWG said in a report released Wednesday.

They added: “In recent years, North Korea appears to be strategically selecting places away from the border area to carry out these killings.

“Monitoring and control of the assembled audience at these events is tightening to prevent information on public executions from leaking outside the country.”

“Our findings suggest that the Kim (Jong Un) regime is paying more attention to human rights issues as a response to increased international scrutiny.”

It also comes after the younger brother of North Korea’s founder Kim Il-Sung died.

Kim Yong-ju’s death was first reported on Wednesday, according to the official Korean Central News Agency.

They said said leader Kim Jong Un sent a wreath on Tuesday to express deep condolences over the death of Kim Yong Ju, who is believed to have been once purged from the leadership following a power struggle.

The news agency has not reported when and how the former honorary vice chairman of the standing committee of the Supreme People’s Assembly died.

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